The Essential Facts of Backgammon Strategies – Part Two

Tuesday, 31. March 2020

As we have dicussed in the last article, Backgammon is a casino game of ability and good luck. The aim is to shift your checkers safely around the board to your inner board and at the same time your opposition shifts their checkers toward their inner board in the opposing direction. With competing player checkers heading in opposite directions there is going to be conflict and the need for particular techniques at particular times. Here are the two final Backgammon techniques to complete your game.

The Priming Game Plan

If the purpose of the blocking strategy is to slow down the opponent to shift his chips, the Priming Game plan is to completely barricade any movement of the opposing player by constructing a prime – ideally 6 points in a row. The competitor’s checkers will either get bumped, or result a bad position if he at all attempts to escape the wall. The trap of the prime can be built anyplace between point two and point eleven in your half of the board. Once you have successfully assembled the prime to prevent the activity of the opponent, the competitor doesn’t even get a chance to toss the dice, that means you shift your chips and toss the dice again. You will win the game for sure.

The Back Game Technique

The aims of the Back Game plan and the Blocking Game strategy are similar – to hurt your competitor’s positions hoping to improve your odds of winning, but the Back Game technique uses seperate tactics to achieve that. The Back Game technique is frequently utilized when you are far behind your opponent. To compete in Backgammon with this plan, you need to hold 2 or more points in table, and to hit a blot (a single piece) late in the game. This technique is more complex than others to use in Backgammon because it needs careful movement of your pieces and how the pieces are relocated is partly the outcome of the dice toss.

The Essential Details of Backgammon Game Plans – Part One

Saturday, 21. March 2020

The objective of a Backgammon game is to shift your pieces around the game board and pull them from the board faster than your opposing player who works just as hard to achieve the same buthowever they move in the opposite direction. Winning a game of Backgammon requires both tactics and luck. How far you can shift your checkers is up to the numbers from rolling the dice, and the way you move your pieces are decided on by your overall playing techniques. Players use a few plans in the different parts of a match depending on your positions and opponent’s.

The Running Game Plan

The goal of the Running Game strategy is to bring all your checkers into your inside board and bear them off as quickly as you could. This technique concentrates on the speed of moving your chips with absolutely no time spent to hit or stop your competitor’s checkers. The ideal time to use this plan is when you believe you might be able to shift your own pieces quicker than the opposing player does: when 1) you have less checkers on the game board; 2) all your checkers have moved beyond your opponent’s chips; or 3) your opponent doesn’t use the hitting or blocking tactic.

The Blocking Game Tactic

The primary aim of the blocking plan, by the name, is to stop the opponent’s checkers, temporarily, while not worrying about moving your pieces quickly. After you’ve created the barrier for your opponent’s movement with a couple of pieces, you can shift your other pieces quickly off the game board. You should also have an apparent strategy when to back off and shift the checkers that you utilized for blocking. The game becomes intriguing when the opponent uses the same blocking technique.

The Essential Facts of Backgammon Strategies – Part 1

Friday, 13. March 2020

The aim of a Backgammon match is to shift your checkers around the game board and get them off the game board faster than your challenger who works just as hard to do the same buthowever they move in the opposing direction. Succeeding in a game in Backgammon requires both strategy and luck. How far you will be able to shift your pieces is up to the numbers from tossing the dice, and just how you move your checkers are determined by your overall playing strategies. Players use differing plans in the different parts of a game depending on your positions and opponent’s.

The Running Game Strategy

The goal of the Running Game technique is to lure all your pieces into your inner board and get them off as fast as you could. This strategy concentrates on the speed of moving your pieces with little or no time spent to hit or barricade your competitor’s pieces. The best time to employ this tactic is when you think you can shift your own checkers quicker than your opponent does: when 1) you have a fewer checkers on the game board; 2) all your pieces have moved beyond your opponent’s checkers; or 3) your opposing player doesn’t use the hitting or blocking technique.

The Blocking Game Strategy

The primary goal of the blocking technique, by the title, is to block the opponent’s chips, temporarily, not worrying about moving your pieces rapidly. After you have established the blockage for the opponent’s movement with a couple of pieces, you can move your other chips quickly from the board. The player should also have an apparent strategy when to extract and move the chips that you used for the blockade. The game gets intriguing when the opponent uses the same blocking technique.